amulet – Roberto Bolaño (translated by Chris Andrews)

amulet.jpg

Every time I read and review a book that has been around for a number of years, I am confronted with a dilemma, is my view adding anything worthwhile to the plethora of other reviews that happen to be in the public domain? Will my views sway anybody into a purchase or an avoidance? Am I just posting here to say “I read this book too”?

I personally own all of Bolaño’s novels, short story collections and poetry collections, so why I decided to pick up “amulet” is now a blur. I have some vague recollection of glancing at Wikipedia and thinking it was an early work so I’d start with it. Having a look at Wikipedia now I notice it makes no mention of “Monsieur Pain” on the main Bolaño page, so a bit of work needs to be done on that page.

“amulet” is not an early work, it was published soon after “The Savage Detectives” and contains a number of links to that work (more on them later).

A first person narration by Auxilia Lacouture, she could say she is “the mother of Mexican poetry”;

By day I busied myself at the university; by night I led a bohemian life, and slept, and gradually scattered my few belongings, leaving them in the houses and apartments of friends: my clothes, my books, my magazines, my photos. I, Remedios Varo, I, Leonora Carrington, I, Eunice Odio, I, Lilian Serpas (ah, poor Lilian Serpas, I still have to tell you about her). And my friends, of course, would eventually get tired of me and ask me to leave. I would try and make light of it and leave. I would hang my head and leave. I would give them a kiss on the cheek and say thanks and leave.

Auxilio Lacouture is locked in the bathroom of the university in 1968 whilst it is raided by the military and the police, an historical moment in Mexican history, known as “Mexico 68” and leading up to the Olympic Games in Mexico City, brought on by ideological and political clashes. The narration takes place from the bathroom as Auxillo talks of the past, the future and a little of the present.

I don’t know why I remember that afternoon. That afternoon of 1971 or 1972. And the strangest thing is that I remember it prospectively, from 1968. From my watchtower, my bloody subway carriage, from my gigantic rainy day. From the women’s bathroom on the fourth floor of the Faculty of Philosophy and Literature, the timeship from which I can observe the entire life and times of Auxilio Lacouture, such as they are.

Besides Bolaño’s style, which of course I adore, why else would I own every book he wrote (those translated into English that is), this novel has a number of interesting connections to other works. Besides the common recurring Bolaño alter ego Arturo Belano, about half way through the book we come across Ernesto San Epifanio, who had earlier appeared in “The Savage Detectives” . Of course Auxilio also appeared in “The Savage Detectives” in Part II Chapter four, a full 10 page single paragraph that is almost replicated word for word as the opening to “amulet”. The short novella a little more polished in my opinion. Back to Ernesto;

Then we walked down the Avenida Guerrero; they weren’t stepping so lightly any more, and I wasn’t feeling too enthusiastic either. Guerro, at that time of the night, is more like a cemetery than an avenue, not a cemetery in 1974 or in 1968, or in 1975, but a cemetery in the year 2666, a forgotten cemetery under the eyelid of a corpse or an unborn child, bathed in the dispassionate fluids of an eye that tried so hard to forget one particular thing that it ended up forgetting everything else.

After a long drunken night, Ernesto and Arturo “why still hadn’t turned twenty-one” travel “down that turbulent river that was and is the Avenida Guerro”, crossing the metaphorical River Styx into hell, “into the kingdom of the King of the Rent Boys”, where Arturo is going to negotiate the release of Ernesto’s “body and soul”.

Another interesting reference is, of course, (apparently Bolaño’s only reference) to 2666.

As Auxilio, locked in the bathroom, moves from time and place to time and place it is as though a dreamlike fog has descended upon her tale. Surrealist painters emerge, obscure poets, mothers of painters, promiscuous characters move in and out of the spotlight. The references to real characters are vast, unfortunately not a lot of their work is available in English.

To complete the surrealist picture, Auxilio is taken on an operating table to attend the birth of History. A reference to the permanent social change that occurred as a result of the student sacrifice and protest.

Another interesting work from one of my favourite writers, the references coming thick and fast, giving me reading lists to keep me going well beyond the grave, the mythological links, and the links to other works of his own, all part of the melting pot that is Roberto Bolaño.

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4 thoughts on “amulet – Roberto Bolaño (translated by Chris Andrews)

  1. I regard the blogging we do as part of a conversation among booklovers around the world, and I think we occupy an important niche. Not everyone wants to read academic interpretations of the literature we read, but they don’t want to read the sort of commercial reviews that feature on Amazon either. I think that’s because there’s a trust issue: not all, but some reviews on commercial sites are part of a marketing campaign by the author, sometimes as blatantly as getting an editor or a friend to write ‘the honest review’. Speaking for myself, I do buy books that my blogging friends recommend, because I have learned to trust their taste, and I also enjoy reading reviews of books I’ve read, especially if I read them a long time ago.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks Lisa, I also saw your link to “Why would anyone review poetry” and I’m starting to wonder why I do so? Again it is as part of a broader conversation, and yes, I am not going to have a raft of academic interpretations, however I do believe there is a “market” for a simpler approach & maybe it will lead to new readers, or people finding new works. It is only through being part of this blogging community that I end up reading and commenting on all that I do.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Exactly: and I think it’s important not to be discouraged by stats. If you’re blogging a niche, then the mega stats are not going to happen, but we build a loyal audience for what we do. Which reminds me, I need to suggest to Pandora that they archive your reviews of Australian poetry….

        Liked by 1 person

  2. There is not all that much writing about Amulet, really. You are well withing the window of writing something new. It is not like you are wasting your time writing about Henry James or Thomas Hardy.

    Amulet, along with Distant Star, are the short Bolaño books I think I still need to read. Those connections you mention almost create a puzzle to decipher.

    Liked by 1 person

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